Buying Tips for Whiskey Lovers

  Georgie  Hawthorne     November 21, 2021    80

 

If you are looking for a good whisky, it is important to know what constitutes a good whiskey. A whisky's taste can be determined by many factors including the type of grain used in the distillation process, the length of time it was aged, and whether or not it has been blended with other whiskies. Additionally, there are several different types of whiskies such as Scotch whisky (made from malted barley), Bourbon (made from rye or corn), Irish whiskey (made from either malted barley or unmalted oats) and Tennessee Whiskey (made from corn).

 

A few attributes that make up a quality whisky like The Lakes Whisky are:

  • Smoothness.
  • Complexity.
  • Sweetness.
  • Spiciness.
  • smokiness.
  • It should also have a long finish.

 

Know your budget

Whisky prices can range anywhere widely in price, from very low to extremely high prices. Depending on the age of the whisky the price can increase. For example, age statements that are less than 12 years old might increase the price by a small margin, while whiskies over 15 or 18 can cost upwards a pretty penny!

 

Understand the different types of whisky

There are different types of whiskies that suit different people. These include:

  • Scotch whisky (made in Scotland).
  • Irish whiskey.
  • Rye whiskey - a very similar style to bourbon and made from a mash of at least 51% rye grain. Other grains used include corn, barley and malted rye.
  • Single malt whisky - made from a mash of only malted barley. It must also be made on the same site as where it is aged, which separates it from ‘blended malt whisky’.
  • Single grain whisky - a subtype of American whisky and distilled at one particular distillery.
  • Bourbon - an American style that is made in America with 51% corn.
  • Tennessee Whisky - essentially bourbon but filtered through sugar maple charcoal to remove some harshness before barrelling for ageing,
  • Corn Whisky - similar to Bourbon, but uses more than 80% corn; cannot claim itself as straight or labelled "100%" if over 20%.

 

Whisky is also divided into categories based on the region where it was produced. These regions include Ireland, Japan, Canada, United States, Scotland & England/Wales as well as other countries such as France, India and Australia. Some whiskies are more complex than others depending on the ingredients that were added during production. For example, some use peat or fruits which might affect their flavour profile. One way you can find out if those particular types of whiskies suit your palate and taste are by finding a whisky bar or restaurant that offers sample flights. This way you can try out several different types of whiskies and see which ones are more to your liking before making the investment in purchasing a bottle. Whisky is not only about how it tastes but also where its ingredients come from, what makes up the recipe and type of glassware needed for serving.

 

Consider what you want to drink it with - mixers, food, or on its own

What accompanies a whisky, whether it is the chaser or the food, will have a significant impact on how it tastes. A good example would be a spicy Mexican dish, which could pair well with an aged scotch and also complement each other's flavour profile. On the flip side, if you're looking for something to sip by itself without any distractions or accompaniments, then you will want to look out for specific characteristics such as rich notes of vanilla and caramel paired with hints of citrus fruit flavours.

 

How to store your whiskey so that it tastes better

The way you store your bottles of whisky will have a huge impact on how it tastes. For instance, if you keep your bottles in direct sunlight, the heat can cause flavour changes to occur faster than usual. If possible, store them inside of cabinets or closets where they are not exposed to light and excessive heat for longevity purposes.

 

The best way to serve whiskey

Whisky should ideally be served at room temperature so as to preserve the flavour and aromas. However, this doesn't mean it should be heated up in a microwave or kept on top of a stove-top burner because those methods will cause evaporation which also affects the flavours negatively. The best way to serve it is over ice so that the flavours and aromas are preserved for a longer period of time. However, it can also be served neat.

 

In order to preserve whisky's unique flavour, you should only add ice if you plan on drinking it quickly. If not, adding ice may make your drink watery over time because as the cubes melt, they dilute the alcohol content with water. When choosing which glasses to serve in, ensure that all people use them will enjoy their drinks equally by using smaller tumbler-style glasses instead of large snifters so everyone has an equal chance at experiencing a full glass of whisky without any part being watered down from melted ice.

 

Whisky cocktails for people who don't like the taste of straight-up alcohol

For those people who don't really like the taste of straight whisky, there are a few different types of drinks that can be made with the stuff. There's the classic Mint Julep and Whisky Sour which both contain fresh fruit juices in order to balance out some of the more bitter aspects of drinking straight alcohol. Then once you have gotten used to those cocktails there is always Irish Coffee which adds coffee and cream so it is less harsh on your stomach lining than just plain old alcohol, along with adding flavour from brown sugar.

 

As previously mentioned, there are certain characteristics that make up a good whisky. These include hints of vanilla paired with citrus fruit flavours which are typically present in scotch whiskies because these were some of the favoured drink choices by prime ministers Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher back in their day. No matter what type you prefer though, choosing something great comes down to personal preference so try out different types until you find one that suits your taste. A great option these days is true artisan craft whisky like The Lakes Whisky.


 Article keywords:
the lakes whisky

 


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